chronic daily headaches · spoonie · writing

“How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” Chapter 14: When The Blues Come Calling

There are many days where I get the blues. Most of the time, it’s due to the limitations and frustrations that my headaches have caused. There’s no way for me to pinpoint what gets the blues going. There’s no moment that I can recall setting them off. They just happen. One moment, I’m energetic and laughing, the next I feel like I can’t physically move from my bed.
This chapter of “How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” is all about getting the blues when you live with a chronic medical condition.

*I skipped a couple of chapters, because this chapter is very powerful, I believe.

This chapter discusses some things the author believes can help with your blues.

  1. Avoid “comparing mind.” It’s easy to believe that we are the only ones who get the blues. Our friendly neighbor across the street seems to always be cheery. Our friend who has the perfect job and relationship seems to have it all. Etc, etc. But that’s not the case. Everyone is subject to illness, hurt and struggle. You are not alone.
  2. Treat the blues with friendliness and compassion Even if we aren’t physically alone on the days when we get the blues, the blues can often make us feel as though we are completely isolated. I feel this way normally when I get the blues. By trying to convince yourself that you shouldn’t feel that way, you are only hurting yourself. Lend yourself some compassion. You are allowed to feel this melancholy way.
  3. Change the environment–physical or mental. Sometimes you need to just get out of the space you are in. Go for a walk outside, go for a drive, sit in a local coffee shop. Somewhere new. Somewhat recently on a day that I had the blues, my boyfriend took me on a long drive on a fall evening. I don’t know how to describe it, but it worked–it pulled me out of my blues and that one little change of scenery had a larger impact on me than I imagined. It was difficult to get myself out of bed and into the car, but 5 or so minutes into the drive I was really happy that I did. You can also change your mental environment. Do something creative–I like to write and sketch. It pulls my mind in a different direction and gives me the outlet that I need.
  4. Remember that the blues are impermanent. Moods and emotions are unpredictable and always changing. Even though it may seem muggy and gray right now, tomorrow may bring about brighter days with happier times. Just like the weather, they will change.
Note here: “the ‘blues’ is to be distinguished from a heavy or dark mood that goes unchanged for weeks at a time and interferes with work or personal relationships. The latter could be a sign of clinical depression, in which case you should consider seeking advice of a health care practitioner.”

 

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