adapt · chronic daily headaches · invisible illness · my journey · spoonie

Do Only What You Can Do Today to Create The Reality You Want for Yourself Tomorrow.

 

I have a very hard time accepting my own reality. I’m sure many people experience that every once in awhile. Like when you were younger and you were grounded but you really wanted to go to that party, so you convinced yourself that you weren’t grounded and you went anyways, only to get into more trouble. It probably would’ve been better to just stay home, accept your punishment and wait for the next party. Or like when you know you have a million things on your to-do list, but you still go out and grab drinks with your friends or binge watch all of the real housewives episodes, only to then stress yourself out even more knowing you achieved nothing. We would be so much better off if we just accepted our reality as it is in that present moment, rather than pretend we are living some alternate reality that we daydream about.

 

Currently, I wish that I could be more physically active than I know I can be. I listen to friends talk about their workout routine and how they’re losing weight and growing stronger and more confident. I’m happy for them. I am. And after the few minutes of acting like Eeyore knowing that my body can’t do all of the the things that theirs can, I then convince myself that I actually can do what they’re doing. Why should my life be any different? They all face difficulties themselves. They pull muscles, tear ACLs, herniate a disc, etc and they all end up recovering and getting back into their exercises weeks or months later. So what’s stopping me from doing the same?

 

This is when I need a pretend slap in the face to wake myself up to my reality and the fact that my reality is not anyone else’s reality. My headaches intensify not only when I lift weights, or run or do yoga, but simply even when I walk up stairs, bend over, or push furniture around. My exertion headaches have no mercy on activity level. It’s something I’ve been dealing with since I was a teenager. I half expected them to be gone by now, but again, I was only kidding myself, right?

 

While I know I can’t squat big weight or run on the treadmill in order to lose weight and gain muscle quickly like “normies,” I do know that I can do just what I am capable of and no more. I have learned to endure the headaches throughout a workout and stop myself when the headaches grow to be more than I can handle. (It helps that I can handle more than someone else may due to the longevity of my illness.) Each day I have to remind myself that my routine will be very different than anyone else’s. I am unique and that’s ok. I won’t be as physically fit as I dream of, but I can do what I can to get close to that dream. I’m learning to accept my body and it’s limitations, but it’s something I have to remind myself of and teach myself daily.

 

So, just today, I’ve created a workout plan for myself. Two days of weights (more reps, less weight-in order to keep the impact low), three days of yoga (check out Yoga With Adriene, she’s awesome!) and two days of rest. Now, I know that this is an ideal plan. I know that my illnesses will throw curveballs at me and that there’s no way I will be able to stick to this routine as strictly as another person may be able to. I’m bound to have a migraine or narcolepsy spell come in and make me miss a day or two. It’s inevitable. I can’t control that. What I can control is how I accept the fact that I can make a routine, stick to it as best I can, not push my body more than I need to, and be cognizant of the fact that there will be days when my illness throws my schedule out of whack.

 

We have to learn to accept our realities as just that–our realities. We can’t compare ours to anyone else’s, just as someone else shouldn’t compare their reality to ours. We must constantly adapt, though the frustrations will want us to do otherwise.

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