2017 WEGO Health Awards–Vote for The Headache Heroine!

I am excited to share (even though I may have already initially shared) that I have been nominated for the WEGO Health Award in the 6th Annual WEGO Health Awards! Last year I was nominated for three categories and a finalist in two. This year, I’ve been nominated for two categories: Best in Show: Instagram  and Best in Show: Twitter.

WEGO Health is a mission-driven company connecting healthcare with the experience, skills and insights of patient leaders. They are the world’s largest network of patient leaders, working across virtually all health conditions and topics.

The WEGO Health Awards were created to celebrate those who tirelessly support the mission of WEGO Health: to empower the patient voice. With 16 award categories, the WEGO Health Awards are the only awards across all conditions and platforms, that recognize the over 100 thousand inspiring Patient Leaders who raise awareness, share information, and support their communities – but often without recognition.

Being nominated means that I have in some way, shape or form helped another person like myself–someone who struggles with health issues and who may have at one point felt or still feels totally alone in their journey. I’m so glad that I can use my experience to empower others to feel empowered.

I’m looking to you, my incredibly supportive network, to help endorse me for this award.

Click here to be taken to my WEGO Health Awards profile and click “Endorse” under my nominee photo. You can vote twice–once for each category that I have been nominated in!

If you’ve ever felt touched by something I’ve written and shared, if I’ve ever made you laugh or inspired you to keep fighting–please consider endorsing me for this award!

Thanks fam 🙂

Do Only What You Can Do Today to Create The Reality You Want for Yourself Tomorrow.

 

I have a very hard time accepting my own reality. I’m sure many people experience that every once in awhile. Like when you were younger and you were grounded but you really wanted to go to that party, so you convinced yourself that you weren’t grounded and you went anyways, only to get into more trouble. It probably would’ve been better to just stay home, accept your punishment and wait for the next party. Or like when you know you have a million things on your to-do list, but you still go out and grab drinks with your friends or binge watch all of the real housewives episodes, only to then stress yourself out even more knowing you achieved nothing. We would be so much better off if we just accepted our reality as it is in that present moment, rather than pretend we are living some alternate reality that we daydream about.

 

Currently, I wish that I could be more physically active than I know I can be. I listen to friends talk about their workout routine and how they’re losing weight and growing stronger and more confident. I’m happy for them. I am. And after the few minutes of acting like Eeyore knowing that my body can’t do all of the the things that theirs can, I then convince myself that I actually can do what they’re doing. Why should my life be any different? They all face difficulties themselves. They pull muscles, tear ACLs, herniate a disc, etc and they all end up recovering and getting back into their exercises weeks or months later. So what’s stopping me from doing the same?

 

This is when I need a pretend slap in the face to wake myself up to my reality and the fact that my reality is not anyone else’s reality. My headaches intensify not only when I lift weights, or run or do yoga, but simply even when I walk up stairs, bend over, or push furniture around. My exertion headaches have no mercy on activity level. It’s something I’ve been dealing with since I was a teenager. I half expected them to be gone by now, but again, I was only kidding myself, right?

 

While I know I can’t squat big weight or run on the treadmill in order to lose weight and gain muscle quickly like “normies,” I do know that I can do just what I am capable of and no more. I have learned to endure the headaches throughout a workout and stop myself when the headaches grow to be more than I can handle. (It helps that I can handle more than someone else may due to the longevity of my illness.) Each day I have to remind myself that my routine will be very different than anyone else’s. I am unique and that’s ok. I won’t be as physically fit as I dream of, but I can do what I can to get close to that dream. I’m learning to accept my body and it’s limitations, but it’s something I have to remind myself of and teach myself daily.

 

So, just today, I’ve created a workout plan for myself. Two days of weights (more reps, less weight-in order to keep the impact low), three days of yoga (check out Yoga With Adriene, she’s awesome!) and two days of rest. Now, I know that this is an ideal plan. I know that my illnesses will throw curveballs at me and that there’s no way I will be able to stick to this routine as strictly as another person may be able to. I’m bound to have a migraine or narcolepsy spell come in and make me miss a day or two. It’s inevitable. I can’t control that. What I can control is how I accept the fact that I can make a routine, stick to it as best I can, not push my body more than I need to, and be cognizant of the fact that there will be days when my illness throws my schedule out of whack.

 

We have to learn to accept our realities as just that–our realities. We can’t compare ours to anyone else’s, just as someone else shouldn’t compare their reality to ours. We must constantly adapt, though the frustrations will want us to do otherwise.

June is Migraine & Headache Awareness Month!

June is Migraine & Headache Awareness Month! This month is dedicated to advocating for patients like myself who suffer from an invisible illness that is much more debilitating, physically and emotionally, than most people know.

I’ve lived with migraines & exertional headaches for a little over 10 years now. They have changed the way I live my life entirely. I had to stop playing sports, start avoiding the hot/humid weather, try to accept that I can’t live as active a lifestyle as I wish and overall adapt to the diagnosis.

I’ve lived with chronic daily headaches (meaning no days with a “0” pain level) for around 3-4 years now. This has had a much bigger impact on my life than my migraines, because while my migraines are extremely painful, they only happen on occasion. These chronic daily headaches have become my new norm–they’re like my shadow, always there. The only time I don’t feel them is when I’m sleeping. My chronic daily headaches have resulted in many mental health ups and downs, anxiety, relationship/friendship strains, tons of forced FOMO, many days at home missing the fun, etc.

But this is not meant to be a sob story post. Instead, this is meant to be a post that opens peoples eyes to the debilitating nature of migraine and headache disorders. There is an urgent need to increase awareness of the impact migraines and headaches have on a person’s quality of life. Let’s spend this month (and every month after) shining a light on these disorders and advocating for everyone who deals with them.