“How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” Chapter 14: When The Blues Come Calling

There are many days where I get the blues. Most of the time, it’s due to the limitations and frustrations that my headaches have caused. There’s no way for me to pinpoint what gets the blues going. There’s no moment that I can recall setting them off. They just happen. One moment, I’m energetic and laughing, the next I feel like I can’t physically move from my bed.
This chapter of “How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” is all about getting the blues when you live with a chronic medical condition.

*I skipped a couple of chapters, because this chapter is very powerful, I believe.

This chapter discusses some things the author believes can help with your blues.

  1. Avoid “comparing mind.” It’s easy to believe that we are the only ones who get the blues. Our friendly neighbor across the street seems to always be cheery. Our friend who has the perfect job and relationship seems to have it all. Etc, etc. But that’s not the case. Everyone is subject to illness, hurt and struggle. You are not alone.
  2. Treat the blues with friendliness and compassion Even if we aren’t physically alone on the days when we get the blues, the blues can often make us feel as though we are completely isolated. I feel this way normally when I get the blues. By trying to convince yourself that you shouldn’t feel that way, you are only hurting yourself. Lend yourself some compassion. You are allowed to feel this melancholy way.
  3. Change the environment–physical or mental. Sometimes you need to just get out of the space you are in. Go for a walk outside, go for a drive, sit in a local coffee shop. Somewhere new. Somewhat recently on a day that I had the blues, my boyfriend took me on a long drive on a fall evening. I don’t know how to describe it, but it worked–it pulled me out of my blues and that one little change of scenery had a larger impact on me than I imagined. It was difficult to get myself out of bed and into the car, but 5 or so minutes into the drive I was really happy that I did. You can also change your mental environment. Do something creative–I like to write and sketch. It pulls my mind in a different direction and gives me the outlet that I need.
  4. Remember that the blues are impermanent. Moods and emotions are unpredictable and always changing. Even though it may seem muggy and gray right now, tomorrow may bring about brighter days with happier times. Just like the weather, they will change.
Note here: “the ‘blues’ is to be distinguished from a heavy or dark mood that goes unchanged for weeks at a time and interferes with work or personal relationships. The latter could be a sign of clinical depression, in which case you should consider seeking advice of a health care practitioner.”

 

“How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” Chapter 8 Summary: “The Many Benefits of Patience”

Chapter 8 of “How To Live Well With Chronic Pain and Illness” outlines the many benefits of patience when it comes to living a life with chronic pain and/or illness. We are patients. And we need to be patient. This word patient is such a commonly used word in our life’s dictionary.

Everyone loses their patience–maybe traffic is bad and you just want to get home; maybe the wait time at the doctor’s office is unbearable and you can’t stop glancing at the clock while sighing; maybe today just isn’t your day.

One hard truth about life: sometimes, it just doesn’t go your way. But the author puts this fact into perspective for us a bit in this chapter. She says that “it’s not the fact that we don’t get our way that makes us miserable; it’s how we respond to that fact. The question becomes, do we get angry and upset, or do we tolerate and accept whatever’s happening that we don’t like?”

The author notes that by practicing patience in her life, she has noticed two things:
1) being patient is a way of treating yourself with compassion
2) being patient gave rise to equanimity–the even-tempered, peaceful state of mind that accepts with kind understanding that our lives will not always conform to our preferences.

The author then outlines her four-step approach for working with stressful and painful emotions. See below:
1) Recognize it: Recognize that impatience has arisen
She goes on to talk about how we often tend to think that the environment around us should conform to our expectations (ex: no traffic jams, no long lines, etc.) ; we tend to think that people should conform to our expectations (ex:they should behave the way we think they should) **I am very guilty of this** ; our expectations are often unrealistic when it comes to mastering new skills ; our expectations are almost always unrealistic when it comes to what goes on in our minds.

She suggests trying to come up with specific examples from our own lives that we can fit under these categories, which in turn will help us recognize that we are responding with impatience.
2) Label it: Label impatience when it is present in your mind
Try investigating your emotions from an objective point of view. It’s easy to place judgement on ourselves for how we’re feeling, but that isn’t fair nor compassionate to ourselves.
3) Investigate it: Investigate how impatience feels in your mind and in your body
Try to pay attention to how you feel when you’re impatient–is your body relaxed or tensed, is your mind calm or anxious?
4)Let it be
“Calmly accept the presence of impatience knowing that, with time, conditions will change..and so will my mind”

It’s the peace of mind that comes with accepting, without aversion, that delays, difficulties, and annoyances will inevitably be among life’s experiences.