Napping In Public & Not Letting Pain Cancel My Plans

This weekend I made a quick weekend trip away with my little brother to Duke University! He wanted to visit the campus & my Virginia Tech Hokies we’re playing them in a football game that weekend, so it was a win-win.

We enjoyed walking around the campus (I’ll admit, it was beautiful.) The weather was great, sunny & breezy & not too too hot.

But as luck would have it, I ended up with a bad headache about an hour or so before the game was supposed to start. I wasn’t surprised by the pain, because we had been walking around for hours in the sun (and the campus isn’t flat, so there were lots of going up & down hills/stairs.)

Walking up stairs, exhausted, out of shape

My exertion headaches have always been ruthless & I haven’t been able to find any treatment that has helped them. So I always just have to suck up the pain if I want to participate in certain outdoor activities.

Because my brother is so patient & always supportive, he was ok with us sitting down and relaxing in the student center for about an hour before the game. We managed to find a place where I could nap for a short bit, because I knew at that point, only sleep would help decrease the pain I was feeling. So that’s what I did, I shamelessly napped in the Duke University Student Center. But honestly, it helped! I felt a lot better when we got to the game and I was able to enjoy the experience with my brother & create those memories with him. I didn’t want to let my pain stop me from being able to do that.

Moral of the story: Listen to your body & do what you need to do to lessen your pain. Getting awkward stares while you nap in public is worth feeling good enough to enjoy whatever event/evening/etc that you had planned! And don’t be afraid to ask the people you’re with to adapt their plans to help you feel better, because trust me, they want you to feel better too!

Shout out to my brother who encouraged the public napping & who is always willing to adapt plans to make sure I’m feeling ok💛

Duke university

September Intentions: “A Little Less Talk, A Lot More Action”

I’ve decided to really focus on living my life, day by day, with more intent. And when writing down what I wanted my intentions for this new month to be, I realized there was sort of a theme: A little less talk, a lot more action.

I always tell myself I will put more time and energy (what little of both I have left in my week) toward my writing, my blog and my efforts to create a community for people with chronic health problems. But I never stay true to my own word. I’m not proud of it, so I need to find a way to actually live out my intentions.

And I’m hoping these September intentions will help me do just that.

September intentions

Do have something you’ve told yourself you will start doing that you haven’t started actually doing yet?

What advice do you have for people with chronic illness on putting their words into actions – especially when we have less energy than most?

What are your intentions for this month?

Telling Your New Supervisor About Your Chronic Illness or Condition

One thing I have always been nervous about when starting a new job is telling my new supervisor that I have chronic health conditions. It’s a conversation that is necessary but that can cause people to feel uneasy or nervous.

I always worry that my supervisor may be uneasy about my situation and that they themselves will worry about my ability to perform my duties. With a health conditions that are invisible on the outside, like my migraines, narcolepsy, etc., I sometimes worry about the following things: Will they think I may not perform as well as others? Will they get frustrated with how frequently I need to leave for doctor appointments? How understanding will they be when I am having a bad pain day and need accommodations or need to go home to rest? Will they understand if they don’t have health problems themselves? How can I make sure they don’t think I’m faking it.

As with anything, we can’t understand what someone is dealing with unless we are dealing with it ourselves. It goes the same for health conditions. Someone can’t fully understand the symptoms that come along with our conditions & illnesses unless they have that condition or illness themselves.

However, when it comes to working in an office, good supervisors will always be accommodating and will try to understand as much as possible. Even though I’ve always been nervous to talk to my supervisors about my chronic illness upon being hired, I’ve only ever had amazing supervisors who put my health first and who are completely flexible.

giphy

Here are some tips on how to breach the topic and talk through your chronic health conditions & illnesses with your new employers and supervisors:

  • Be open and honest – the more your supervisor knows, the more accommodating, flexible and understanding they can be
  • Remember that everyone is human and everyone deals with something. Maybe they also get migraines or deal with another health condition. Even if they don’t, you have to remember that they will have their own situations that need accommodating from time to time.
  • Remind them that you will be fully capable of doing your job and that this won’t affect your work ethic. Instead, it just means that some days the pain will take control,  that your health will have to take precedent & some days you will have to do what is necessary to feel better or decrease the pain however much you can.
  • Work with them to come up with back up plans on if there’s ever a day that symptoms show up unexpectedly and you need to stay at home on short notice.
  • Tell them about the doctor appointments that you have on a regular basis but make sure they know that from time to time, emergency appointments may come up.
  • Ask them if they require any doctor notes for validation so that you can notify your doctor

Remember: You are just like the employee sitting next to you. You are capable of performing and producing excellent work. You have the same great work ethic and great ideas to contribute. This employer hired YOU for a reason. Because you were right for the job!


Disclaimer: I am not a doctor or a lawyer. The opinions and advice listed above are my own and are based on personal experience and do not reflect the opinions of others. Check out the Americans with Disabilities Act if you have any questions on working as a person with a disability.