For Those People Who I’ve Pushed Away

I’ve recently stumbled across the website The Mighty. It’s a website where people living with disabilities, diseases and mental illnesses can submit their real stories and have them published to not only reach those who suffer as well but to reach those who live with and love someone who is suffering. It’s an awesome site and It’s definitely worth checking out whether it’s relevant to you right now or not.

Recently published on this site was an article written by a young lady who I can very closely relate to regarding an issue that I’ve never really figured out how to quite put into words myself. She did a wonderful job doing so for me and everyone else who feels the same way.

Read the article here–“To My Loved Ones When I Don’t Want Your Company”

When I’m facing a high (as in a 9 or 10) pain day, most of the time I want to retreat to my bed, curl up under my covers and escape into my own world. Like the writer of this article said, it’s partially for my loved one’s sake but partially for my own sake.

I push my loved ones away for their sake because I don’t want them to feel uncomfortable or sad.  So often when someone sticks around, I’m worried about how my health issues are taking over their life as well. My weakness is causing their mental and emotional strength to waiver and I will feel the need to protect them and to comfort them. While there are other times I am able to do this, during high intensity pain days, I don’t have the energy to do that.

But part of it is for my own sake. When I’m facing days like these, I end up getting so totally lost in my own head. I spend my time wondering how my heavy, throbbing head can feel so physically disconnected from the rest of my body. As the writer states in the article, it’s such a personal experience to feel so unwell to the point of not knowing how to handle your own body let alone your thoughts that arise from the unbearable pain. It’s an experience I don’t want anyone else to have to witness.

There are times when I need solitude and there are times when I need my loved ones around. Don’t feel as if it’s a personal attack when someone with a chronic disorder asks for you to leave during these high pain moments. We may not want you there in that moment, but we are so grateful for your willingness and readiness to be there for us whenever and wherever we need you.

 

Time Stops For No Man

A not-so-friendly reminder for anyone who lives with a chronic condition or a continuous hardship that often keeps them holed away inside: The world keeps spinning, the clock keeps ticking and the years keep flying by.

This thought makes a continuous loop in my mind, driving me almost mad. Have you been driven mad by it before also? If you’re thinking to yourself “no I haven’t,” then please share with me your secret.

I’m in a period of my life where I’ve been handed multiple bad hands all around the same time. Do I think I’m the only one in this position? Of course not. Am I grateful that my situation is not worse? Always. But do I still lose myself to an overpowering feeling of frustration and helplessness sometimes? If I said no, then I’d be lying to all of you as well as myself.

Today I woke up with a headache that I knew was going to stick around for the rest of my Saturday. As my body and mind awakened, I couldn’t help but think”here we go again”–A thought I’m usually very capable of pushing away, making room for much more encouraging and positive thoughts to fuel my day. But I’m only human and we all have our moments.

A day of pre-planned activities, of seeing family, of changing out of my sweats and leaving the house, all slipped from my fingers before I even had a chance to attempt to keep my grip on it. My bed was my companion today and my thoughts were that friend in the group who always shows up unwelcome and then sticks around until you show them the door.

Most of the time, I give myself an hour or two before I kick myself into gear and start acting like my normal self again. But there was one thing my brain just couldn’t let go of today: The idea that I have wasted (and will continue to waste, as it’s looking right now) so much of my little time here doing nothing fun, nothing of significance and nothing that will make memories, due to my headaches tying my hands and my feet to my bedposts. I’ve spent so many mornings, afternoons and evenings wondering what other people are up to while the next episode of Friends automatically starts playing on my laptop. It leaves me feeling so full of resentment. It leaves me feeling like I have to play such a large game of catch up with the rest of my family and friends the next time I’m feeling up to getting out of bed.

If you’re reading this and rolling your eyes thinking “Girl, lose the drama because you have it nowhere near as bad as other people” Then please, keep thinking it, because you’re absolutely right. I still have a functioning body, an intelligent (boastful, much?) mind, and all of life’s necessities at my fingertips. I don’t live in the hospital, I merely just make my friendly visits there. I take medicines to help me get along, but I would be able to survive without them. My life is wonderful in comparison to thousands of others. I’m incredibly lucky to be able to do so many every day activities on a pretty routine basis. So I apologize in advance if my venting offends anyone. My problems are so minute and I resent myself for thinking those thoughts of resentment and for sometimes adopting that “woe is me” mindset. It’s a terrible cycle to jump into. Grab a hold of the rails before you accidentally fall into it as well.

I don’t enjoy sharing these thoughts with others, mainly due to the fact that I don’t want to seem ungrateful for what I’ve been blessed with in my life. But, why have this blog if I can’t write about what I am honestly experiencing, feeling and thinking? My purpose of starting this all was to reach others who might possibly be feeling something similar to what I am feeling. I’m sure other spoonies out there, and even other people who may be facing something in their lives that are keeping them from doing everyday things they hope they could be doing, know this feeling of losing time to something that so often takes control of their lives.

I didn’t mean for this post to be a buzzkill, per se. It’s one of those days, though, where writing has been the only outlet that has helped start to set my mind right again.

I wish I could practice what I preach more often and focus on the positive things every day of my life, but as many things are, it’s much easier said than done.

A goal of mine now, after having spent the day angry about the lost time in my life, is to spend every waking moment that I feel healthy enough to be doing something other than lying in my bed, doing something new, exciting, adventurous, fulfilling, thoughtful, and memorable.

There’s no real way to know what tomorrow will bring. But I do know that I’m going to take full advantage of every moment that I can. I don’t want to be afraid to hear the ever-present clicking sound of the minute hand ticking away on that clock on the wall.

 

The Most Typical of Mondays

Yesterday was a test of my patience, perseverance, and temper. What started out as a classic “Monday Mishap” escalated into a “Monday Mayhem.”

I experienced those typical “ugh” moments that everyone faces pretty often-losing your wallet (temporarily, thankfully), dumb drivers on the road, timing mishaps and office troubles–but there was one segment of my day that just really set me over the edge.

While I’ve been making some progress with my headaches and narcolepsy situation, I’ve only seemed to take numerous steps backward in my journey with food allergies.

After ending up in the ER two weekends in a row, I’ve been eating really “safe” foods because it’s nerve-wracking to eat when you aren’t 100% sure what your food allergies are. So yeah, the anxiety is continually on the rise. So I did what any normal person would do (after a year…whoops.) I made a follow-up appointment with an allergist–optimistic that the doctor would be able to ease some of my anxiety, answer some of my questions, and bring even a tiny bit of peace to my mind. Yet, I got just the opposite.

I’ve seen my fair share of doctors and I’ve seen a few who I didn’t exactly see eye to eye with regarding treatment plans. However, I’ve never seen a doctor who made me feel so belittled, frustrated and generally pissed off before. He looked at me like I had ten heads when I asked him questions and told him things other doctors have told me. For reference, I’m very new to the food allergy world. It’s not like I’ve had a peanut allergy my entire life and know how to manage it–no I recently developed a seafood allergy–which he thinks is not even possible (what?) He spewed his BS at me, shook his head like I had told him I got my information from “The Onion” rather than from accredited doctors, and sent me on my way to get a blood test for only crab and salmon (to my knowledge, there is other seafood out there, but what do I know right?) Times like these I wish I had been ballsy enough to tell him his word meant nothing to me and walked out, but I politely left the office and went to go get stuck by another needle. (although the guy who took my blood was awesome, so super grateful for that. I’ve never had such a painless experience getting blood drawn. props to him.)

I understand that there are times when people have bad experiences with doctor visits. However, for spoonies such as myself who see doctors more often than they see most of their friends, it’s extremely frustrating. It wasn’t so much that I was sad, I was just genuinely pissed off at this guy. It was a waste of my time–and spoonies also know how valuable time spent in a doctors office is when we’re trying to find answers.

I sat in my car afterward cursing the doctor wishing I had told himself to stick his handshake where the sun don’t shine, until my dad kind of set my mind right. He made me realize that there’s really nothing to cry about. I’m allowed to be pissed off, but I have to be able roll with the punches. I have to be able to take the annoyances and learn from them. I have to try to find even the tiniest positive thing from the experience and move on to what’s next.

We’ll all have days that make us want to break things and scream to the skies yelling “Why me? What did I do in a past life to deserve this shit?” But at the end of the day, we can’t change what just happened. We have no control over what and how much gets thrown in our path. We do, however, have control over how we handle those days. We can throw in the towel and walk away cursing under our breaths. We can rage until someone fixes their wrongdoings brought upon us. Or, we can take a deep breath, calm ourselves down, figure out the next step and move forward. We can gather our patience, grab a hold our temper, and persevere on.

It’s not the destruction that’s tearing you down that will define who you are or where you go in this life. It’s how well you step over the rubble and walk through the fire.

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