Thursday Tips & Tricks: Theracane 

This is the Theracane.

I bought it at the PT office I was going to for therapy appointments for my head/neck. Basically, this theracane mimics the massage techniques done by the physical therapists in order to restore muscle function; relieve tension, stiffness soreness, etc; and basically just help your body feel better!

For headaches: I use it on my neck, upper back and the spot right where the back of my head meets my neck. I apply pressure and try to relieve tension in those areas, because that kind of tension can worsen headaches and even cause headaches for some.
I’d definitely recommend buying one, especially because you can use it on so many areas of your body! 

Thursday’s Tips & Tricks: Consider Physical Therapy

Thursdays Tips & Tricks 😍⚙ think about giving physical therapy a try! 

I started physical therapy a couple of months ago (I think? My sense of time is awful 🙈). My PA wrote me a prescription for it, to have the PT work on my neck, posture and whatever they could think of to help my daily headaches. 

I can’t say that it has solved my problem (because if that were the case there would be some newly very wealthy people), but it has definitely helped decrease the intensity of my every day headaches 😁💪🏼 

I have multiple headache disorders. So what the physical therapist is treating is my diagnosis of a cervicogenic headache—again, just one of my multiple types of headaches. They work on my posture (which was so bad before) as well as getting more motion and working out tension in my occipital nerves, muscles and bones (which all impact headaches). 

Bad posture causes tension in upper back and neck muscles. That along with having occipital nerve and muscles out of whack, can definitely make headaches worse.

It was a gradual positive change that I noticed. And it took a lot of trial and error and experimenting with different methods on my PT specialists side. We found that some methods didn’t do anything while some (more intense looking) methods helped dramatically.

And you know that saying no pain no gain? That can be very relevant to some PT sessions. They work on your back, neck, muscles, bones and nerves. Some things aren’t going to feel pleasant. But let’s face it–it’s nothing compared to the pain I (and all chronic illness sufferers) battle every single day. 

I’ve had some headache setbacks during the time period I’ve been doing PT, but they have been related to other outside causes (because that’s how life of a spoonie works, right?) But I can safely say that my physical therapy team has tried really hard to help me feel better, even if it’s just a small change.

People with chronic illness can atest, even a tiny positive change is considered great progress! 

Therefore, I definitely recommend PT to someone who is in a rut like I was–where they aren’t or weren’t seeing any progress in their headaches. 

Give it a try, because Ryan gosling might massage you after (offer not guaranteed)